Expressway to Your Skull (2014)


Psychedelia and horror go hand in hand like Fox news and an inability to accept white people can be terrorists too.


The psychedelic horror is colourful, and distorts reality, often with mind bending effects and chilling absurdity, that make cult cinematic experiences at their very best.


Dario Argento, David Lynch, and David Cronenburg are masters of the genre, bringing us repulsion with finesse and tall tales with a skewed view. The Shining, Suspiria, Eraserhead, and even the recent overlooked classic Reeker, are all prime examples of kaleidoscopic FX that give the viewer an almost hallucinogenic experience.


When someone asks you to review a film for them, you immediately feel apprehensive. Especially when asked for an honest opinion. Although, I have no problem being honest (as those who know me will happily attest to), I don’t like crushing dreams or hurting feelings when the person in question has done nothing to deserve it. Especially when their art clearly has had so much work put into it.


I was kindly sent a private link to a small independent film, called Expressway to Your Skull, but within minutes my apprehension lifted, because I was immediately engaged and within minutes enjoying its style.


The film follows a young 20 something couple with a complicated, and cash strapped existence, who escape on a spontaneous road trip, camping out in the woods. After an unsettling encounter with a local, the two realise that rather than getting away from their problems, they’ve run into something far worse.


Although it was described to me as a psychedelic horror, I don’t think it’s a film that can be pigeon holed in such a way, as it can fit into the backwoods/city versus country genre, supernatural horror, and even has a creepy thriller quality to it.


Paced well, with a decent, believable cast, Michael Okum’s directing début was a confident and strong film that thoroughly impressed me. It had a clear, defined plot and realistic, yet engaging script, and although there were some faults in sound quality in places, I think that there is incredible potential in what I’ve seen.


Originality in horror is sorely lacking, and what Okum has managed to achieve is an interesting twist on an old standard, that is both entertaining and well executed.


The film was released by Brain Damage Films on DVD November 3rd and VOD on December 1st, so if you are a fan of the independent horror, I highly recommend you watch this.

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This entry was posted in critique, fiction, film and media, horror, murder, opinion, pop culture, psychological horror, psychotic killer, rant, supernatural horror, survival horror, thriller, torture, Twist ending, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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