Night of the Demons (2009)

Night of the Demons (2009)

Normally the remake is a point of contention with me. If it aint broke why fix it? Sometimes it’s the crappy things about movies that I love – wobbly sets, bad acting, special effects that look like they were done by a five year old ..sigh, good times indeed .. But generally the remake makes baby Jesus cry with it’s stupid glossy image, tanorexic actors, and expensive looking effects because in all of that it loses the charm of the original. The Hills Have Eyes, The Omen, Last House on the Left, and Nightmare on Elm Street are recent culprits not to mention criminally bad, taking themselves way too seriously and taking the focus away from horror screenwriters/directors that have thoughts and ideas that weren’t already churned out years ago.

There are of course exceptions to this – House on Haunted Hill (It was a fairly decent effort, and Geoffrey Rush’s performance and a tongue in cheek attitude managed to make it edgy and a classic in it’s own right. Not on the same level as the original but they were competing with a Vincent Price film after all. ), and Dawn of The Dead (Not a patch on the original, but Zack Snyder managed to make it both entertaining and very current) both impressed me, which you can tell by my blogging past – is no mean feat, but whadya know – the 2009 version of Night of the Demons made the cut.

For anyone who isn’t familiar with the 1988 original, Night of the Demons concerns Angela, the local misery chick (you know the type – Gothy, kind of a bitch, likes to shock and heavily into the occult ..kinda reminds me of someone ..), who throws a ‘’party’’ (I’m using the term lightly because well, 10 kids dancing awkwardly in a room with a massive boom box isn’t a party in my books) in the local spook house, where they are basically massacred by some demons. It is frankly, a classic – not to mention awesome, with a weird side story about an old man who likes to put razor blades in the trick or treat goodies he hands out to the kids. Like I said – Awesome.

The remake never hit the big screen in the UK as far as I’m aware, which is a shame because its not at all bad, especially compared to the fact Nightmare on Elm Street got a cinema release and was a slap in the face of all who paid to see it, but that’s what you get for being an optimist I guess ..

In the new version the party Angela throws looks like an actual good time – music, many people and muchos alcohol are all involved, but it ends up getting shut down Mr Police and his band of party poopers and everyone departs leaving an unlucky bunch of stragglers to get accidentally locked in for the night. So we have Angela, a guy dressed as what I think it a goth (no imagination), a doctor, what I’m assuming is a zombie (her costume is crappy), two cats (if porn stars were animals), and a drug dealer (that’s not a costume he is just a drug dealer) left to spend the night in a house that has some seriously bad juju. Oh and to top it off they find some skeletons in the basement. Yeah, we’ve all had nights like that! Angela gets bitten by one of the skeletons while trying to steal a gold tooth out of it’s skull (giving whole new meaning to the term gold digger), and gets infected with demon juice which then gets passed around to a couple of the others through various bodily fluids, leaving the non possessed to run around the house a lot trying to survive.

I’ve got to say I loved this. The film had a real eighties quality to it and I liked the modern slant on the old classic. There were a couple of familiar faces in Eddie Furlong and Shannon Elizabeth (one of those chicks you recognise but never remember what she was in), and along with the cheesetastic yet cool FX made it a highly entertaining watch. I only wish I had more thumbs, because two thumbs up just doesn’t seem enough praise.

If you are a fan of the original, it’s a must see and if you aren’t well, I have nothing more to say to you – kindly leave my blog.

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